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Anatomy

Buccal Mass of Eledone cirrhosa

By December 14, 2020March 22nd, 2021One Comment
This is an app I have been working on and of for some time now. The goal is to be able to show my 3d models in a way I intended them and, in the same time, have a script that I can apply to a wide range of models.
Even though I made this one responsive as I do with everything on this website, this post is best viewed on a larger screen. I’m still searching for a way to make these apps completely responsive on all screens and load in an order that does justice to the app, but that takes time. 

Buccal Mass of Eledone cirrhosa explained

Eledone cirrhosa is one of the most common cephalopods and regularly used for research. In this application the beak and musculature of this cephalopod is shown and explained. The beak is important because most of the time it is the only remains of any cephalopod, so researchers are eager to link the appearance of the beak to species, size, gender and age. The beak is controlled by a complex musculature. The musculature shown here is interpolated from the study done by Uyeno and Kier in 2006 on Octopus bimaculoides, the beak is from an Eledone cirrhosa specimen I examined myself.

References

1.Uyeno, Theodore A., and William M. Kier. “Electromyography of the buccal musculature of octopus (Octopus bimaculoides): a test of the function of the muscle articulation in support and movement.” Journal of Experimental Biology 210.1 (2007): 118-128.
2.Nixon, Marion. “Beak and radula growth in Octopus vulgaris.” Journal of Zoology 170.4 (1973): 451-462.
3.Ikica, Zdravko, et al. “Analysis of beak morphometry of the horned octopus Eledone cirrhosa, Lamarck 1798 (Cephalopoda: Octopoda), in the south-eastern Adriatic Sea.” Acta Adriatica 55.1 (2014): 43-56.

Offline application

And if you want to check this at your leisure offline, here a link to a pdf with the same application. This one can only be viewed on a computer, not in the browser. Click on this title and the pdf opens in another window:

Buccal mass of Eledone cirrhosa

Mieke Roth

AboutMieke Roth

Animal scientist gone information architect gone scientific visualizer. I've got two loves of my life: my son and my work. Luckily I can give them both enough attention.

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